June 13, 2014

Good stuff. Makes a change.

 

There is a God*:  hellhounds ate their dinner.  For like the first time in a fortnight.  Maybe three weeks.  I don’t know how much these thrilling new horizons of food prejudice are the new treatment they’re on, how much is the weather—although summer only began about this week**—how much is natural hellhound perversity and how much is the Borg.***  But it is hard on the person poking food down their throats two or three times a day†.  I suppose it is too much to hope for that this is a new trend. . . .

Meanwhile.  I’ve been singing.††  I’ve had a series of tiny epiphanies this week in a sort of PING-OW-PING-OW ††† cattle-prod pattern.  Nadia’s new beginner soprano was ahead of me this week instead of the scary could-have-been-professional-WHY-AM-I-BOTHERING bloke.  And she was torturing poor old Caro Mio Ben in a way that made me feel almost nostalgic.  But . . . I could hear what Nadia is doing with her.  In a way that you can’t hear yourself.  I know I’ve been that route‡ but it’s waaaaay different from the inside.  I could hear her ‘real’ voice breaking through occasionally‡‡ and I could hear what Nadia keeps telling me about me, that pitch is not the problem, making the sound is the problem, and if/when I make the sound correctly the pitch will be fine.‡‡‡

PING.  OW.§

Last week was not a great week in what I acknowledge has been a too-little-interrupted series of crap weeks, and I was expecting Nadia to have to spend most of my lesson winkling my voice out of hiding.  It’s a bit prone to slamming the door shut and hiding under the bed.  I’m so used to going to my lesson to be re-set that I don’t always notice what I’m doing at home because it can’t possibly be any good, now can it?  Nooooooo.§§  I go through the frelling blasted motions and then take the pieces in to Nadia to do something with.  So, for example, I have been failing to notice that recently, even when I’m having a crap week, there’s still enough voice for me to sing with.

I was singing within the first few minutes of warm-up last Monday.  SINGING.  Nadia didn’t need forceps or anything.  And we had a really good bash at Vedrai Carino§§§.  And . . . okay, so I’ll never be Joyce DiDonato, but at my age it would be kind of a waste, not to mention that I already have a perfectly good creative career.  But . . . I do have a voice.  I may never get much beyond singing Jesus Is My Boyfriend for Sunday service at St Margaret’s but . . . I have a voice.  I have to stop saying I don’t.

PING.  OWWWWWW.

Also . . . my voice got tired before the end of the lesson because it had come roaring out of its silk-lined palanquin with such uncharacteristic dispatch.  I came home thinking if I sang more and maybe developed some stamina, and engaged more with what I chose to sing and why I chose it. . . .

PING.  To be continued. . . .

* * *

* Hahahahahahaha.

** And my annual anguish about when/if to turn the Aga off.

*** Who mess with our dogs and our rose-bushes as well as our computers to keep us demoralised and malleable.  Souvenir de la Malmaison is out there laughing her thorny little socks off because of course Death by Sunlight began after all the rain had wrecked most of her flowers this year as usual.  Since she’s now about forty feet tall she’s oppressing all my neighbours too.

† Two bottom lines:  they get really ill if they miss more than one meal in a row, as I re-proved recently^, and the new drug has to be given with food.

^ None of us enjoyed the experience

†† Well duh.

††† And another one bell ringing at Crabbiton last night.

I was only the third person to arrive expecting to pull a rope and Felicity was wondering if she should have cancelled practise—it’s June, it’s hot, everyone is at home enjoying the long daylight and either drinking their iced tea or pouring it over their heads to cool off—and Wild Robert wasn’t going to make it.  Three more people turned up.  Yaay.  Crabbiton only has six bells:  we’re good to go.

Um.  Except for the fact that Felicity and I were the good ringers and . . . um.

The funny thing is . . . we had a good practise.  Everyone managed to do something that made them feel they were learning something.  In poor Felicity’s case this was mostly the thankless task of holding practise together.  In my case . . . she frelling made me frelling call SEVERAL touches of frelling Grandsire doubles.

I used to know a simple-minded touch of Grandsire where if you can count to three twice you’ll do.  And then various things happened, including that I started ringing at Forza where there are eighty-seven bells and almost enough good ringers to ring them, and you’d better not even admit that you can (probably) call the notorious beginner’s touch of Grandsire doubles.  And then when I recently began ringing at Crabbiton . . . Wild Robert decided it was time I learnt the touch after the beginner’s touch.

I have spectacularly failed to learn this new touch, and in the process—especially since it’s been a while since I tried to call it—I have forgotten the beginner’s touch.

Last night I re-invented it from first principles, with some help from the band.^  It took three tries but . . . we did it.  And the teeny-weeny epiphany was:  Wild Robert wants me to learn this second touch because it’ll force me to pay attention to where the other bells are, rather than blindly following a simple pattern for my bell.  I don’t have enough brain.  Counting to three twice is enough, when you’re also ringing a frelling bell.

Except . . . I had to pay some attention to where the other bells were last night, to re-figure out the simple pattern for mine.  I didn’t do it well or thoroughly . . . but I did it enough to have a tiny insight into what Wild Robert is on about.  And what I’d have to do to call his nasty next touch.  PING.  OW.

Now I have to decide if I’m going to tell him.

^ YOU CAN’T CALL A BOB THERE.

‡ Including torturing Caro Mio Ben.

‡‡ Note that she has more voice than I did when I began, but, as I was telling someone again recently, everyone has more voice than I did when I began.  Nadia, Sorceress.  Put her up against Circe and Circe would creep away weeping and get a job as an insurance adjuster.

‡‡‡ This is not to say there aren’t pitch problems out there.  I used sometimes to follow a woman with quite a nice voice . . . who couldn’t carry a tune in a basket.  I think she has stopped coming.

§ Also just hearing Nadia beginning to open her up is cheering somehow.  It makes it more of a process and less . . . sorcery.

§§ I’m also having a meltdown crisis of confidence about the Samaritans as we approach the end of training and the beginning of duty.  SIIIIIIIIIGH.  I am so predictable.

§§§ Mozart is my man.  Although if anyone could find a half-decent edition of Beethoven’s folk song arrangements for solo voice I would be all over it.

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